Below you find the last seven QuirksBlog entries.

Styling and scripting sliders

Permalink | in Coding techniques

I’m currently working on my first real paid coding project in ages: PvdApp, a project of a friend of mine. (He paid for this research, so he deserves a link.)

Among other things, this project requires me to style and script sliders. There are several interesting points I would like to bring to your attention, such as a few underreported IE problems, the solution to Android WebKit’s appearance bug, and the proper use of the input and change events. And a quick syntax overview is always useful.

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A new Device Adaptation spec

Permalink | in Viewports

Back in April I lamented numerous problems and vaguenesses in the current W3C Device Adaptation spec. One of the spec’s editors, Florian Rivoal, contacted me, agreed that the spec had some problems, and explained some of its less clear features to me. In return, I explained some features I think should be added to the spec.

Within about ten mails we had agreed on the features that a future version of the spec should contain. This article summarises our conclusions, and adds a few questions a future version of the spec should answer.

Also, this article serves as a quick overview of where the viewports stand today. Everything described below works in almost all browsers right now, with the exception of the @viewport syntax. So this is useful reading for every web developer.

Finally, there’s one question that must be answered: If you use (x-based) responsive images on a desktop site, and the user zooms in, should you load the higher-DPR images? The answer is important for defining desktop DPR and screen.width/ height.

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QuirksMode outage

Permalink | in Site

The QuirksMode.org DNS entry did not work for about 55 hours, from Sunday 27th around 15:00 to midnight on Wednesday 30th. This is by far the longest time my site has ever been offline since it started (under a different name) in 1998. I’m not happy about it, but the matter was beyond my control.

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A note on weird font size changes in mobile Chrome

Permalink | in Chrome

Yesterday I stumbled upon one case in which some mobile Chromes change the font size of elements without having been ordered by the CSS. This article gives a quick overview.

My test is incomplete and will likely remain so, since these changes only occur in fairly unusual circumstances, and spending days and days of research time seems wasteful. Nonetheless I want to leave a note for researchers who come after me.

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Stop pushing redux

Permalink | in Web featuritis

My Stop pushing the web forward post got quite a few reactions. It’s time for a redux.

Counting Twitter reactions, it struck me that there were far more people who agreed with me than who disagreed. Sure, this is anecdotal data, but I didn’t expect it — I’d hoped for 50% or so agreement at most. There was disagreement as well — some of it dickish, but most quite polite. (At a certain point I had a sad about the dickishness, but looking back it was not all that bad, just the inevitable consequence of saying something that’s — so far — outside the mainstream of web thought.)

The big pushback against my feature moratorium idea came from Jake Archibald with an assist from Bruce Lawson (who also provides a list of other reactions), while Aaron Gustafson tried to find a middle ground. This response mostly focuses on Jake’s piece.

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Stop pushing the web forward

Permalink | in Web featuritis

Fair warning. You’re going to hate this one. I want to stop pushing the web forward for a while. I want a moratorium on new browser features for about a year or so.

Recently I’ve been having serious doubts about the whole push the web forward thing. Why should we push the web forward? And forward to what, exactly? Do we want the web to be at whatever we push it forward to? You never hear those questions.

Pushing the web forward currently means cramming in more copies of native functionality at breakneck speed — interesting stuff, mind you, but there’s just too much of it.

Quick, name all the new features browsers shipped in 2015! You see? You can’t. That’s the problem.

We get ever more features that become ever more complex and need ever more polyfills and other tools to function — tools that are part of the problem, and not of the solution.

I don’t think this is a particularly good place to push the web forward to. Native apps will always be much better at native than a browser. Instead, we should focus on the web’s strengths: simplicity, URLs and reach.

The innovation machine is running at full speed in the wrong direction. We need a break. We need an opportunity to learn to the features we already have responsibly — without tools! Also, we need the time for a fundamental conversation about where we want to push the web forward to. A year-long moratorium on new features would buy us that time.

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The Chinese Firefox OS fork is all about control

Permalink | in Firefox Mobile

Last week the news broke that Acadine Technologies, a Hong Kong start-up led and peopled by mostly ex-Mozillians, raised venture capital to create H5OS, a Firefox OS fork. I believe the political motivations behind this move have been underreported.

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Even older entries

See the July 2015 archive and beyond.

This is the blog of Peter-Paul Koch, mobile platform strategist, consultant, and trainer. You can also follow him on Twitter.
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